Posted by: A Taste of Ireland.com | April 9, 2014

A Taste of Ireland Presents Beoir ‘A Tale of Irelands Craft Ale’

Ok folks, here it is a trailer for Beoir the first film from the Tall Story Media stable, http://www.tallstorymedia.com specially produced for http://www.atasteof-ireland.com

This film will soon be available for screening.

  • So if you are a Restaurant, Pub, venue, a society, a festival  or a beer club that would like to show an Irish made short film about Ireland`s emerging craft beer scene please leave us a comment to arrange a screening.

 

Beoir, (the Irish word for beer), is a short  film about the emerging Irish craft brewery scene, showcasing The Donegal brewing company, Innishmacsaint brewing company, Mescan brewing company, Kinnegar brewing company and Poker Tree brewing company. These new mainly farmhouse breweries are based on the wonderful green island of Ireland. This film showcases not only  the breweries but the Island of Ireland itself. Listen to the brewers tell their story in their own words and follow them on their journey at the very start of this emerging craft brewing scene in Ireland. From under Irelands holy mountain Croagh Patrick to the lakes of Fermanagh, Beoir is a fascinating and beautifully shot film.

Music by Stray Theories “Even though we sleep” http://www.straytheoriesmusic.com

And Irish band  (formerly Ladydoll: “Genetics”, (Currently Noir Noir).

 

 

Donegal Brewing Company sits high on the banks of the Erne in Ballyshannon, Irelands oldest town and hometown of Irish guitar legend Rory Gallagher. Established in 2011 their first beer is now ready for your enjoyment…“A delicious blond style beer, with hints of biscuit, malt and a good balance of hop flavours. No artificial colours or preservatives”

Featuring: Brendan O’Reilly of The Donegal brewing company and Dicey Reilly’s off license, Probably Ireland’s best off license, which is an Aladins cave of craft beers and rare alcohols in general.

GIVEAWAY TIME

We have a some Donegal Brewing Company, Donegal Blonde beer, as seen in the video to giveaway.

TO ENTER, LOOK FOR THE + SIGN IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT HAND CORNER OF YOUR SCREEN AND SUBSCRIBE TO THIS SITE AND LEAVE A COMMENT ON THE DONEGAL BREWING COMPANY BLOG POST TELLING US WHY YOU WANT TO TRY DONEGAL BLONDE BEER.
The case can only be delivered within the Republic of Ireland or Northern Ireland. The winner will be randomly chosen and notified by email. Giveaway will close at 6pm 10th APRIL.

Subscribers to this post will be in for a chance to taste some poker tree in our Poker Tree Brewing company giveaway, closing date 6pm 30th March. http://atasteof-ireland.com/2014/03/20/a-taste-of-ireland-irish-micro-brewery-series-episode-1-poker-tree-breing-company-co-tyrone/

A Taste of Ireland can also be followed on facebook for more news on great Irish food heroes and giveaways.

SEE LINK BELOW

https://www.facebook.com/pages/A-Taste-Of-Ireland/200420766678763?ref=hl

COMING SOON

EPISODE 2: Donegal Brewing Company Co Donegal

Episode 3: Mescan Brewing Company Co Mayo

Episode 4: Innishmacsaint Brewing Company Co Fermanagh

Episode 5: Kinnegar Brewing Company Rathmullen Co Donegal

Episode 6: West Mayo Brewing Company Co Mayo

Want to be involved, contact us at A taste of Ireland via twitter, facebook or this blog site!

Or we can be reached via the contact page at http://www.tallstorymedia.com

DONT FORGET YOU CAN KEEP UP TO DATE WITH THIS SITE BY LOOKING FOR THE + SIGN IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT HAND CORNER OF YOUR SCREEN TO SUBSCRIBE TO THIS SITE FOR NEWS ON BEER GIVEAWAYS AND GEAT SHORT FILMS ON IRELANDS MICROBREWER SCENE,

SUBSCRIBERS WILL RECEIVE AN EMAIL ANY TIME WE POST A SHORT STORY FILM OR ANNOUNCE A GREAT CRAFT BEER GIVEAWAY.

Poker Tree Brewery – Brewers series by Tall Story Media from Aidan Monaghan on Vimeo.

A Taste of Ireland has teamed up with Tall Story media to bring you an exciting new series on the blossoming Irish Micro brewery scene. This is the first in our series of films on this subject.

Based in Carrickmore, Darren Nugent founder of Pokertree Brewing Company, tells how he produces his signature range of four ales. These ales are all bottle conditioned and open fermented using traditional techniques.

Produced by Tall Story Media especially for A Taste of Ireland.com-

Featuring: Darren Nugent – Poker tree Brewing Company pokertreebrewing.co.uk

GIVEAWAY TIME

We have a case of Poker Tree Brewing Company  Ghrian beer, as seen in the video to giveaway.

TO ENTER, LOOK FOR THE + SIGN IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT HAND CORNER OF YOUR SCREEN AND  SUBSCRIBE TO THIS SITE AND LEAVE A COMMENT ON THE POKER TREE BLOG POST TELLING US WHY YOU WANT TO TRY POKER TREE BEER.
The case can only be delivered within the Republic of Ireland or Northern Ireland. The winner will be randomly chosen and notified by email. Giveaway will close at 6pm 30th March.

A Taste of Ireland can also be followed on facebook for more news on great Irish food heroes and giveaways.

SEE LINK BELOW

https://www.facebook.com/pages/A-Taste-Of-Ireland/200420766678763?ref=hl

Oh and by the way tell us what you like about the video!

COMING SOON

EPISODE 2: Donegal Brewing Company Co Donegal

Episode 3: Mescan Brewing Company Co Mayo

Episode 4: Innishmacsaint Brewing Company Co Fermanagh

Episode 5: Kinnegar Brewing Company Rathmullen Co Donegal

Episode 6: West Mayo Brewing Company Co Mayo

Want to be involved, contact us at A taste of Ireland via twitter, facebook or this blog site!

Or we can be reached via the contact page at http://www.tallstorymedia.com

DONT FORGET YOU CAN KEEP UP TO DATE WITH THIS SITE BY LOOKING FOR THE + SIGN IN THE BOTTOM RIGHT HAND CORNER OF YOUR SCREEN TO SUBSCRIBE TO THIS SITE FOR NEWS ON BEER GIVEAWAYS AND GEAT SHORT FILMS ON IRELANDS MICROBREWER SCENE,

SUBSCRIBERS WILL RECEIVE AN EMAIL ANY TIME WE POST A SHORT STORY FILM OR ANNOUNCE A GREAT CRAFT BEER GIVEAWAY.

January God: A short film by A Taste of Ireland.com

January god, Janus Figure Boa Island, County Fermanagh Northern Ireland from Aidan Monaghan on Vimeo.

I have always been fascinated by the Janus figure and Seamus Heaney was moved enough to write his poem January God about it. So here is a short film I have created in tribute to Seamus Heaney and in celebration of Fermanagh’s most famous tourist attraction. The second figure is the Bishop’s stone an equally interesting but less well known stone figure at Killadeas.

Boa Island close to Belleek strangely enough is joined to the mainland via a bridge at either end with a road running through the middle of it, which makes it more convenient for visiting than either White or Devinish Islands on Lower Lough Erne which are all very rich in Celtic spiritual mythology. Follow the signpost for Caldragh Cemetery for here you will find one of the oldest and most famous carved stones in all of Ireland. Known as the Janus Stone which is over 2000 years old and predates Christianity far back into Celtic times. The double sided figure represents the male and female form with a sunken piece in the middle, perhaps for holding antlers and interlacing thought to represent hair, joining them. Nobody knows for certain what its origin or purpose was but it seems highly unlikely that it had anything to do with the Roman God Janus. A more likely suggestion is that it is a representation of the Goddess Babhbha, a Celtic God of war and fertility after which the island is named. Seamus Heaney, our late great poet visited in 2006 and wrote the poem ‘January God’ about it which of course captures the mood and mysticism.

 

The second stone figure is the Bishop’s Stone at Killadeas

The “Bishop’s Stone” – so-called because of the low relief depiction of a cleric – is 1.05 meters high, o.39 wide and 0.23 thick. Facing the church on the broad side of this stone is a simple depiction of of an elderly ecclesiastic in a short garment, holding a crozier and a bell and wearing pointed slippers. The triangular head with the elongated nose and chin of old age and the hunched back make it easy to imagine the short, halting steps of this cleric. It is blieved to have been carved sometime between the 9th and 12th centuries.  On the narrow edge facing away from the church drive is a grotesque head in relief, and a panel of interlace filling the space below. The head, with the rounded features of youth, stares out with rounded eyes (though it’s left eye is somewhat defaced), well defined nose and slightly open mouth. Along it’s left eye and cheek are striating scars – possibly indicating status or membership in some clan.

 

 

 

Posted by: A Taste of Ireland.com | November 28, 2013

A Taste of Ireland Food Heroes Vol 1 , Charity book

Hi all,

I am pleased to announce I have published a new book with all the proceeds going to Twist Soup Kitchens.

The book, A Taste of-Ireland.com Food Heroes Vol 1 is a collection of some of the fantastic Irish food producers I have met since I began this blog in 2011.

It is available as hard cover, soft cover, PDF download and ebook depending on your preference. See links and preview below http://blur.by/1bp1z2s

Ebook available for ~2 euro at http://store.blurb.com/ebooks/449331-a-taste-of-ireland-com-food-heroes-vol-1

Book available online by clicking on image above.

Book available online by clicking on image above.

About the book

In the words of Glen Hansard, “I’m working on a high hope.”

And this high hope is that this book will raise some awareness of two very important and contradictory facts that exist at the present time on this green island of ours.

Firstly, this island is bursting with some great produce & really fine artisanal food producers, in fact I would go so far to say we have some truly world class food producers here at the edge of Europe. Many of these food heroes went unnoticed and dare I say it, unsupported for many years. Luckily there is now a change occurring. Where the general consciousness is awakening to the fact that top quality food, that was always present on this island, is still right on our doorstep. Many chefs thankfully throughout the country are leading the way on this. Local food, made locally by local people with every penny spent on local produce, helping the local economy. This renewed/traditional food culture may turn out to be our most precious resource in terms of economy and tourism.

Secondly however, on this island at this time, Oliver Williams of Twist soup kitchens is seeing “a marked increase in demand” for food at his soup kitchens. The shocking thing is that the demand is no longer just from the homeless and marginalised in our society. The demand is becoming more and more due to pressures on families, particularly single parents, struggling to pay for schoolbooks and uniforms.

Twist is a donation based enterprise where food is donated by local businesses or time is donated by volunteers in order to provide a soup kitchen service that offers free food for anyone that needs it. It relies on the good will of others to help others.

About Twist and their Mission statement

The greatness of a nation is measured by how well it treats the weakest members of its society, not the strongest. My name is Oliver Williams and I am the founder of the Twist Soup Kitchens Galway, Athlone, Roscommon, Sligo and Tuam. When I was 15 years old I left Galway in times similar to now in terms of recession and high unemployment. I went to England to seek my fortune but found myself on the streets alone and frightened. I was lucky to find a place called centrepoint in Soho where I received a hot meal, a bed, and some good advice that paved the way for me to become firstly a panel beater, then mechanic and eventually a helicopter and airplane pilot.

This experience gave me the inspiration to open up the first soup kitchen in Galway. I have never forgot the feeling of being alone and uncared for by society and the crucial helping hand that was centerpoint. I shudder to think what would have happened to me without that help. The Twist outlets have been a total success and we are now feeding over 1,000 people every week. Twist survives on the kindness and goodwill of the Irish people. What we do is give the more needy members of Irish society a hand up rather than a hand out. We are now setting up a food delivery service to those in need and in particular the new poor that are saddled with debt in this country. I am asking you to look into your heart and help me to help them. I am doing my very best to make sure the forgotten members of our society are no longer alone and uncared for. It could be you some day.

Twist soup kitchens kindly request Irish companies to donate any tight dated food or any overstock of product to this cause.

Posted by: A Taste of Ireland.com | July 26, 2013

A Taste of Ireland Sage Restaurant Midleton 12 mile menu

The last few years I had the privilege of living in Midleton Co Cork and as a consequence I had the good fortune to have dined at Sage restaurant, which I always enjoyed, mainly because it was right up my street. Gourmet quality food without the fuss and pomp added to a relaxed and cool atmosphere. Fast forward those few years and I have had the further  good fortune of working on a photographic food project with Kevin Ahern, chef and owner of Sage restaurant Midleton. The portrait work I performed can be seen on permanent display in the new
re-vamped Sage (The 12 mile producers) and in the video below. The old Sage can still be seen on a blog post from a while back while we were working on the project

http://atasteof-ireland.com/2012/02/29/glen-hansard-the-swell-season-sage-restaurant-midleton/

Some of the food photography I was doing is also on the new Sage website. http://www.sagerestaurant.ie/about/  but more will follow soon.

I shall start publishing some of the photographic and video work from those sessions also so keep tuned to my posts right here on this blog.

So for now some of the Sage 12 mile portraits are below (some are my personal choices, Kevin may have printed and displayed an alternative picture in the restaurant).

pork-1-(3) A-Taste-of-Ireland-Tom-Clancy A-Taste-of-Ireland-Orslard-cottage-carrigtwohill A-Taste-of-Ireland-OFarrels-Midleton A-Taste-of-Ireland-John-Tait-Angus-Beef A-Taste-of-Ireland-Ballyhoura-Mushrooms A-taste-of-Ireland-12-mile-menu-Sage-Midleton-12 A-taste-of-Ireland-12-mile-menu-Sage-Midleton-11 A-taste-of-Ireland-12-mile-menu-Sage-Midleton-9 A-taste-of-Ireland-12-mile-menu-Sage-Midleton-7 A-taste-of-Ireland-12-mile-menu-Sage-Midleton-6 A-taste-of-Ireland-12-mile-menu-Sage-Midleton-5 A-taste-of-Ireland-12-mile-menu-Sage-Midleton-3 A-taste-of-Ireland-12-mile-menu-Sage-Midleton-2 A-taste-of-Ireland-12-mile-menu-Sage-Midleton

Good luck and success to Kevin with the Green room (A tapas bar with a 12 mile theme) newly opened alongside the revamped sage restaurant.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/SAGE-Restaurant/63970514966

Posted by: A Taste of Ireland.com | July 7, 2013

A Taste of Ireland Eithna’s by the Sea & Mullaghmore Co Sligo

Mullaghmore Harbour Co Sligo, and the view from Eithne`s by the sea.

Mullaghmore Harbour Co Sligo, and the view from Eithne`s by the sea.

Mullaghmore harbour co Sligo, on a sunny day in July, like today, is in the humble opinion of this writer one of the most stunning locations to spend a day.
Why does this small fishing village in Irelands north west deserve this accolade?
The reasons are many, the fantastic views of the Dartry mountain ranges, (Ben Bulben, Ben Wiskin…), the wonderful sweeping sandy beach, the really beautiful stone harbour, the water sports available such as diving, snorkelling, sailing, the wonderful Atlantic walk around Mullaghmore head, the stunning Classie Bawn castle.

Classie Bawn Castle Mullaghmore

Classie Bawn Castle Mullaghmore

All these things go to making Mullaghmore very special however, top of the list for this writer is the sea food. Mullaghmore is a major port for lobster, crab, and prawns,

See http://www.mullaghmoreseafarm.com/

You would expect to find the best quality sea food available and find it you will, as thankfully Eithne`s by the sea has re-opened,

https://www.facebook.com/EithnasByTheSea

http://www.bythesea.ie/

Eithes by the sea in the sun, best place to be to see the fantastic views of Ben Bulben from Mullaghmore Harbour.

Eithe’s by the sea in the sun, best place to be to see the fantastic views of Ben Bulben from Mullaghmore Harbour.

Eithne at her restaurant.

Eithne at her restaurant.

Eithne`s by the sea is the inspiration for this post, as I have to say I enjoyed probably the best ever lunch I have ever had in any Irish restaurant (Kevin Aherne’s, signature pork dish in Sage Midleton comes a close second), but given the location, the freshness of the Lobster, crab and the sun today, I cannot recommend this wonderful newly re-opened restaurant any more highly.

A little more on the history of the beautiful harbour in particular.

In the 17th century the Confiscation of Connaught was put into effect and the land divided up as payment among the Cromwellian adventurers and soldiers. The two main beneficiaries in Sligo were the Gore-Booth family of Lissadell who were given 32,000 acres and Sir John Temple. The first owner to set foot on the conquered lands of north Sligo was Henry John Temple, the third was

Viscount Palmerston, who arrived by horse and carriage in 1808. He is best known as Lord Palmerston, who served two terms as Prime Minister of England

Palmerston’s greatest achievement and contribution to the area was the development of the beautiful stone harbour in Mullaghmore which still stands. Work on it began in1822 under the direction of the engineer Alexander Nimmo. It was completed in 1841. Palmerston had big plans for it as an exporting harbour, but they never came to fruition.

Myself with the real stars of Mullaghmore, Irish Lobsters

Myself with the real stars of Mullaghmore, Irish Lobsters

Posted by: A Taste of Ireland.com | June 23, 2013

A Taste of Ireland The Mountain Short film in full.

Introducing the full short film by Aidan Monaghan from http://www.aidanmonaghanphotography.com/

This film underlines why we don`t have to go far to see amazing things on this wonderful island of ours.
This summer why not visit Aidan Monaghan`s mountain, the Mourne mountains in Co Down and see their glory for yourself.

Posted by: A Taste of Ireland.com | June 3, 2013

The Mountain short film and exhibition Sat 8th June at QFT Belfast.

Announcing an exhibition of work and short film ‘The Mountain’ by my talented brother at the Queens Film theatre next Sat 8th of June at 3pm
below is a short trailer of the film, ‘The Mountain’ based on the beautiful Mourne mountains.

Posted by: A Taste of Ireland.com | April 19, 2013

A Taste of Ireland: An Fod Dubh Co Mayo

An Fod Dubh Co Mayo

An Fod Dubh Co Mayo

Sometimes the drive to a location isn`t worth it and sometimes like this evening it is worth every penny of petrol used to get there.

Perched right at the edge of Ireland and Europe, is a wonderful Gaeltacht area on the Bellmullet peninsula called Blacksod Bay.

The shot above taken this evening is looking towards Achill Island and Slievemore, a mountain that can appear closer or farther away depending on the weather conditions, as Im told by the locals.

Lobsters are to be found in the sea in the foreground and like most Irish lobster it is exported to europe, not finding any place in these parts selling fresh lobster straight off the boat,

I had to content myself with peperoni pizza. One wonders why we dont eat whats on our doorstep? Lobsters in these parts should cost the same as a pizza.

In fact the picture above shows periwinkles and limpets in abundance a seafood feast but again I had a pizza, something for myself to think about there.

On the way here I passed, Ballycastle, Downpatrick head and Bangor, I got a little confused there I thought I was driving the Antrim/Down coastline for a while.

As a foodie aside I can highly reccomend Marys cottage kitchen in Ballycastle for really good food, and chocolate torte all with an open turf fire

marys-cottage-kitchen 2 marys-cottage-kitchen

 

Nothing left now but to sit back for the evening put a bit of turf on the fire from the omnipresent Mayo boglands, open a beer and stick a bit of Peter Greens Fleetwood mac on.

Posted by: A Taste of Ireland.com | February 17, 2013

A Taste of Ireland Timelapse compilation

Timelapse photography Ireland & Northern Ireland by Aidan Monaghan from Aidan Monaghan on Vimeo.

A brilliant timelapse compilation from A Taste of Ireland contributor Aidan Monaghan featuring Mount Errigal County Donegal, Mourne Mountains County Down, Crom Castle County Fermanagh, St. John’s Lighthouse County Down. Aidan is a professional photographer and all his timelapse photography is available to be licensed, he is also available for commissions. http://www.aidanmonaghanphotography.com

Posted by: A Taste of Ireland.com | February 9, 2013

A light that never goes out.

Crookhaven County Cork, what a dawn the most uplifting dawn shot I have ever witnessed!

Crookhaven County Cork, what a dawn the most uplifting dawn shot I have ever witnessed!

I am told my images exude a light, a spirituality that is quite special, I am rather pleased with that appraisal so I am posting a shot that (in my opinion exemplifies that). This shot was 7 years in the making! My first attempt at this view was an unsatisfactory watercolour painting. However, on this morning I believe all the elements of a perfect image came together, with the rising sun to the right of the lighthouse the focal point in the scene. It was particularly satisfying given the 4.00a.m. rise to travel to the location. Once I saw the orange glow on the horizon I knew I was not going to leave cold and disappointed. The image was taken at Crookhaven, a picturesque harbour village in West Cork. Crookhaven was once very important as the most westerly harbour along the southern Irish coast. Mail from America was collected here and the nearby Brow Head has a ruined observation tower on the summit from where Gugliemo Marconi transmitted his first message (to Cornwall) and received a reply.

below is a special smiths track to me anyway that goes well with this image (for me).

 

if you like this here is an acoustic version

 

Sunset over Sligo`s holy mountain Knocknarea, where Queen Maeve is said to be laid to rest.

Sunset over Sligo`s holy mountain Knocknarea, where Queen Maeve is said to be laid to rest.

So here we are on the the eve of 21 Dec 2012, the day that many people for one reason or another have been saying the world will end. And living here in Sligo the home of western Europes largest megalithic sites, I feel obliged to mark the occasion.

Maeves Tomb at Sunset atop Knocknarea Sligo. According to some records not Meves tomb at all but that of an older Celtic King.

Maeves Tomb at Sunset atop Knocknarea Sligo. According to some records not Maeves tomb at all but that of an older Celtic King.

The  5125-year-long cycle in the Mayan long-count calendar ending tommorrow, Friday  has prompted a wave of doomsday speculation across the globe. The mayan people still around today, say that yes the long count calendar does end tommorrow but as with most calendars that end, a new one will begin and a new age apparently is upon us. And tommorow will be as unremarkable as any winter solstice.

The Mayan Long Count Calendar

Some facts about tommorrow are

  • it is the winter solstice The word solstice comes from the Latin phrase for “sun stands still”.
  •  The winter solstice marks the official onset of winter where the sun is at its lowest in sky. The years darkest day.
  •  The Sun will be aligned with the middle of the Milky Way band, however if this means anything is unclear.
Carrowkeel Sligo, older than the pyramids facing the setting sun.

Carrowkeel Sligo, older than the pyramids facing the setting sun.

A word on the symbolism of the winter solstice.

Ancient thinkers believed that the cycle of the sun during the day  corresponded to the cycle of the sun during the entire year, so, if one imagined  the year as a single day, summer would be the morning and winter, would be the  night. The middle of the winter, then, was the night of the year, a time when  humanity should sleep and dream noble dreams for the next season, when they  should wake up and work to make dreams happen.

The winter solstice is and was celebrated in many different cultures and represented in  mythology as the battle of the virtuous god against the darkness, or  metaphorically, the moment in which an initiate overcomes death and resurrects  from the underworld to bringing light again to his people, just like the sun,  which rises again after the dark night.

Carrowmore Western Europes largest megalithic site.

Carrowmore Western Europes largest megalithic site.

Sligo and its Megalithic monuments.

I am not going to dwell in this article on the many fine megalithic sites that Sligo has to offer,  for that is indeed the subject of another post or even book that I am currently working on. Suffice to say, Sligo is full of some of the most intact and oldest sites in Ireland and the best thing is nobody comes to Sligo! Most tourists are busy getting horse and cart rides in Killarney! Fine by me for the moment, as it will allow me space to do my research and photography, but most visitors ( in my opinion) are missing something truly original by leaving Sligo out of their itinerary in Ireland.

Suffice to say our ancestors here in Sligo have arranged many sites in and around the area of Knocknarea mountain with regard to the sun, and at Carrowkeel the the tombs face the setting sun.

As legend has it they face the that way in order to face their enemies to the north. There are stories aplenty that describe how the warriors of Connaght were buried standing up so that they would for eternity face their enemies to the north. Last thing though as this is mainly a food producer blog, there is a fine cheese made in the shadows of Knocknarea nad I will update you all with that soon.

Belbulbin view from atop Carrowkeel passage tombs.

Belbulbin view from atop Carrowkeel passage tombs.

Finally something musical to accompany this article. Worth reading article to the music.

Posted by: A Taste of Ireland.com | October 22, 2012

A Taste of Ireland Midleton Jameson Whiskey Distillery Co Cork

Coppers still pots at the old Midleton Distillery

Midleton Distillery is Irelands largest whiskey distillery and home to the famous brands of Jameson, Paddy, Powers and the exceptional Midleton very rare.
It also boasts the worlds largets still pot at an approx capacity of 31,000 gallons.

The old distillery is probably one of the best visitors attractions in Ireland with the tour explaining the history of whiskey making, and a tour of the old distillery,  a highlight being one of the worlds largest copper stills and finally a free glass of whiskey. When on the tour make sure you volunteer for a whiskey tasting at the end for more free whiskey!

http://www.jamesonwhiskey.com/Distillery/Virtual-Distillery-Tour.aspx

Old lorry at Midleton Distillery

Originally the site of an old woollen mill established in 1796 the original distillery was established by James Murphy & Co. The original distillery ended its working life in 1975,  moving nearby to the modern facility, however it lives on as a whiskey museum and forms the basis for the tour.

Jameson Whiskey the final product

After a tour a warm glass of Jameson is waiting at the end for all ticket holders  in the Midleton distillery bar.

Midleton Distillery Co Cork kids will love the big still pot and adults the uisce beatha.

Posted by: A Taste of Ireland.com | September 29, 2012

A Taste of Ireland Poc Ar Buile Ballinrostig ‘Where everybody knows your name!’

Michael Murphy outside his Pub in Ballinrostig

The hedgerows are abundant with many forgotten treasures such as the blackberry and down the back roads and hedgerows of east Cork on the way to Inch strand there is  a real gem in the Poc Ar Buile pub in ‘Ballin ‘ as the locals might say. Like most good things in our wonderful country and any country for that matter, the best things are kept for those in the know as Ballinrostig and the Poc Ar Buile pub is certainly not on any tourist guide of the area.

Poc ar Buile great Beamish!

Bringing the house down in Ballin

However for any tourist or foodie, lost around the back roads east Cork trying to find Trabolgan or the Ballymaloe cookery school, they might be lucky enough chance upon this fine watering hole run by the owner Michael Murphy, which boasts a genuine wood fire pizza oven, some of the finest Beamish pints, and probably the warmest welcome in East Cork. Just eight miles from the foodie citadel that is Midleton, customers will find a vibrant country pub, some of the best ‘toilet art’ (the sad clown standing in the sun is a master piece!) anywhere. Next time you are in Midleton you can`t go far wrong if you take a deliberate wrong turn up a back road and end up in ‘Ballin’  where everybody knows everyone else and the craic and ceol is great. For more info check out http://www.pocarbuile.com/

Snooks Lee jamming at Poc ar Buile Ballinrostig

 

Anyone can join in the Craic in Ballinrostig, Even the owner!

Posted by: A Taste of Ireland.com | September 24, 2012

A Taste of Ireland The English Market Cork

 

The English Market is certainly the jewel in the crown of any foodie’s visit to Cork. Trading as a market since 1788, it feels and looks very much like Barcelona’s famous Boqueria market which it in fact pre-dates by almost 80 years. The hustle, bustle, colour and smells of the English market are truly unique. The English Market is the culinary crossroads of the city making it a tour de force of some of the best food produce in Ireland. The market is packed with artisan butchers, cheese sellers, vegetable stalls and fresh fish much of it from Ballycotton and west Cork. Chefs from many of the hotels and restaurants in Cork can be spotted choosing delicacies for the evening menu over the course of a day. The Observer newspaper has listed the English Market as one of the top 10 food markets in Europe, but Corkonians reckon that it is the best.

A very striking sight at the English market is the sheer abundance of quality and fresh sea food something of a rarity in other parts of Ireland. Again this is where the modern English market competes well with its Barcelona twin. Kay O’Connells stand is worth a visit for the sheer theatre of the stall and also see Pat O’Connell  the man the made the Queen laugh so famously.

On The Pigs Back Fantastic range of Irish Cheeses

The English market is home to On the Pigs back one of the finest cheese stalls in the country with a large variety of Irish cheeses and French cheeses.

Isabelle Sheridan is the driving force behind this wonderful stall, and one of the people who have made the English market what it is today. Twenty years ago  the English market was very nearly turned into a multi-storey car park but thanks to founder members of the modern-day market such as Isabelle it wasn`t. This cheese stall alone is worth a visit if not only to see how many quality  Irish farmhouse cheeses are available in 2012.

Other stalls of note are Frank Hedermans smoked salmon, The good olive company (which always offers a free tasting of their olives, excellent for the very peckish passing foodie photographer, just don`t sample too many, they will notice the free lunch brigade!).

There are a myriad of beef, pork poultry butchers specialising in French and polish cuts of meat and for lovers of game pheasants and quail can be bought easily enough. A favourite of mine also is a particular Asian shop which stocks every kind of spice you could ever want. All in all the English market is a foodie heaven, one I unfortunately took for granted while I was living in the rebel county (how I miss you English market).

The English market caters for those with a sweet tooth with a number of chocolatiers.

 

Posted by: A Taste of Ireland.com | August 26, 2012

A Taste of Ireland Make your own Goats cheese

Have you ever wanted to make your own cheese? I have always wanted to so here is a very easy way to make a basic cheese that can be spiced up later and used in dishes that have strong flavours as the cheese has a very neutral taste. But it is great fun to do.

A Taste of Ireland Simple pleasures are the best, blackberries picked from the hedge

Whilst out for a run recently I noticed an older gentleman hanging around the hedgerow, now most people would have thought this odd, that maybe this was a strange old man that should be watched in case he was up to something. I didn`t because I was concious of his secret, which was that the blackberries are in season and the bushes he was picking were yielding a good kilo of delicious ripe blackberries. Admittedly had I not become aware of wild food last year I too would have thought this older, knowlegeable gentleman to be a bit dodgy or in fact quite mad.

He had noticed that I was watching him whilst I was doing my laps so I called over ‘leave me some!’ He went on to explain to me that the bush was yielding at least a kilo a day and would go on so for several more days. We went on to discuss the rosebay willow herb and the ripening elderberries in the vicinity and also how strange it was that noone ever picked blackberries. He even remarked that people would find it strange that two men would be picking wild blackberries instead of buying them down the local supermarket and that some would probably call for us to be taken away in white jackets for doing so. ‘Should be the other way about’ he quipped as he thought it madness to pay for something shipped from Portugal when there it was growing locally for free. I agree, and went back in two days time to pick my kilos worth as the blighter had eaten most of the blackberries going.

Blackberries are in season, I would encourage you all to enjoy a simple pleasure, that is packed full of goodness and vitamin C.

Posted by: A Taste of Ireland.com | July 30, 2012

A Taste of Ireland Mount Errigal County Donegal time lapse

A Taste of Ireland Mount Errigal time lapse. Check out this great time lapse from A Taste of Ireland contributor Aidan Monaghan

Mount Errigal County Donegal Timelapse from Aidan Monaghan on Vimeo.

Posted by: A Taste of Ireland.com | July 26, 2012

A Taste of Ireland Carrigaline Farmhouse Cheese

Carrigaline-farmhouse cheese

The multi award winning Carrigaline Farmhouse Cheese has been handmade by Anne and Pat O’Farrell on their farm at ‘The Rock’ just outside Carrigaline since 1984. The cheese made from pasteurised Friesian cows, is available in 3 flavours, natural, beech –smoked and garlic and herb and are free from artificial additives and preservatives.

Carrigaline-farmhouse-cheese on the racks

 

The cheese wheel products are very pretty and almost too good looking to eat having been dipped in food grade wax 6-times.
Carrigaline is derived from the Irish “Carraig-Ui-Leighin” meaning Rock of the Lynes who were a local clan who built a castle on a limestone rock in the area in 1170. It is under the shadow of this old Castle that Anne and Pat make their fabulous cheese.

Carrigaline-farmhouse-cheese

 

 

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